Philadelphia Consortium Projects - 2019

Adolescents & Young Adults

Methodist Services for Children and Families 

 

Virtual Summer Camp Counselors

 

Student Interns: 

Kaitlyn Dodson, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program

Jan Pasternak, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program

 

Academic Preceptors: 

Robert Dustin, MA, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

Meshonea Fox, BA, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

Community Preceptors: 

Jonathon Rodriguez, OST Program, Methodist Services

Heather Stutz, Educational Programs, Methodist Services

 

Community Site: 

Methodist Services is devoted to the well-being of children, women and families in all walks of life. Methodist Services provides life-enriching services to children, adults and families as they face the challenges of limited resources, increased poverty and homelessness, disability, and inequities in education and behavioral health services. Quality services provided in the Philadelphia area include housing, childcare, education programs, permanence in families, mental health services and nutrition programs. With access to a safe home and family life, as well as health of mind and body, children, adults and families can achieve their greatest potential.

 

https://methodistservices.org/?page_id=61

 

Project: 

The Bridging the Gaps student interns participated in virtual summer camp sessions for middle and elementary school students in the Philadelphia area. The interns created fun, engaging and educational lessons in a virtual format to help improve the summer of these students in the midst of the global pandemic. These programs were focused on fostering exercise and physical health. Interns led health- and fitness-related educational discussions and interactive games and experiments with the students. Interns were responsible for creating and running entire sessions, with support from a host of educators, teachers and administrators from the site.

 

Intern Statements:

Kaitlyn Dodson: “My experience with the BTG CHIP program expanded my horizons to an area that is not my expertise: working with children. It has challenged me to be creative and engaging while also assuming a role of responsibility and leadership. It has brought to my attention some of the difficulties with working with children, especially having to do so in a virtual environment due to a global pandemic. I have grown an appreciation for the supervisors at my site, who have been experiencing these challenges over the past couple of months. Overall, I have enjoyed this experience as a newly rising second-year medical student because I don’t regularly interact with kids, and I feel that it has prepared me in some ways for my future pediatric rotations or interaction with children in general.”

 

Jan Pasternak: “This BTG CHIP experience helped to develop a more creative and empathetic side of me. Since working with children was not necessarily within my comfort zone, I was forced to come to terms with this responsibility. The experience helped me mature as an educator by driving me to translate what I had experienced in my first year in medical school into something new that would be exciting and engaging but could still be understood by younger students. In addition, overcoming difficulties due to the global pandemic was a problem-solving challenge like no other and required me to constantly think on my feet and adapt.”

 

No More Secrets: Mind Body Spirit, Inc. 

 

Tackling Period Poverty: Decreasing Menstrual Stigma with NMS

 

Student Interns: 

Linda Chan, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing

Vivian Lee, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine

Taylor Streaty, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine

 

Academic Preceptors: 

Hillary Bogner, MD, MSCE, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine

Joan I. Gluch, PhD, RDH, PHDHP, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine

Ann L. O’Sullivan, PhD, FAAN, CRNP, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing 

 

Community Preceptor: 

Lynette Medley, MEd, CEO/Founder of No More Secrets: Mind Body Spirit, Inc.

 

Community Site: 

No More Secrets is a sexuality awareness organization that focuses on a realistic approach to sexual health. No More Secrets is currently dedicated to fighting period poverty, the inadequate access to menstrual hygiene products. Period poverty can force menstruators to miss work and school and cause serious health risks. No More Secrets has created the only feminine hygiene bank and home delivery service in Philadelphia. They service Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware and ship nationwide to menstruators in need. No More Secrets is based at 7056 Germantown Avenue, Suite 205, Philadelphia, Pa. 19119. However, most of their time is spent in the community completing delivery requests. 

 

www.nomoresecretsmbs.org

 

 

Project: 

The BTG student interns could not help NMS with deliveries in person due to the virtual nature of the internship, but they completed projects that contributed to the work that Lynette and Nya are doing in the community: decreasing the stigma surrounding menstruation and educating the public about the struggles of period poverty. One intern worked on educational content to teach young menstruators about their periods to diminish any shame or confusion about menstruation, a topic considered taboo in many communities. Another intern worked closely with Lynette in leading the #BlackGirlsBleed social media campaign that addresses systemic racism in the sphere of menstrual health by amplifying Black voices and decreasing the generational silence and stigma specific to menstruation in Black communities. And one intern worked on educational content that aims to teach men, specifically fathers, in the community about the basics of menstrual health, how to best support menstruators, and how to educate their children and themselves. 

 

Intern Statements: 

Linda Chan: “During my first call with No More Secrets, I was surprised to hear that due to the lack of access to menstrual products, there were people in Philadelphia who used construction paper, rags and newspaper as menstrual products. Hearing this really frustrated me, but it also helped me reflect on how fortunate I was to have access to sanitary pads and to have been taught some general information about menstruation growing up. Through this internship, I was made aware of the issue of period poverty and how prevalent it is in the communities around me. I hope to continue encouraging others around me to speak freely about their periods, normalizing the topic and destigmatizing … menstruation. As a nurse in the future, I hope that patients will be willing to approach me if they have questions about their periods and that I will be able to engage in meaningful conversations with them to help others appreciate their body and increase their confidence in themselves.” 

 

Vivian Lee: “During my research for my brochure, I came across this statistic that states about 1 in 5 of their female respondents do not feel comfortable talking about menstruation with healthcare providers (https://femaleforwardtogether.com/#findings-2). I was really struck with this statistic because as healthcare providers we should be making it as easy as possible for menstruators to talk about their periods. I’d like to continue tackling this issue of dental students/professionals feeling weird talking about periods despite it being in the patient’s best interest. I think normalization would be more effective if it starts with health professionals and the patients can understand that it’s a normal thing to talk about. I think that Lynette’s approach to her work (sincere and absolutely not embarrassed or ashamed in the slightest) is a great example to incorporate into my own life as a health professional! Hopefully this will help my future patients feel less shameful as well. I’ve been thinking about how can dentists do the work to decrease stigma around menstruation? This is just a fight against the stigma, not even the fact that menstruators in poverty have no access to menstrual supplies, which forces them to miss work, school and put themselves at health risks.” 

 

Taylor Streaty: “Working with No More Secrets has absolutely changed the trajectory of my personal and professional development. Though I have always been interested in pediatrics and OB/GYN, I now realize there is a glaring gap in menstrual health that has not been addressed in the healthcare system. As a future physician, I hope to work towards ending period poverty by advocating for bills that will actually help those in true need (e.g., though the CARES act added menstrual hygiene products as FSA-eligible, that only applies for those with an FSA! Why not include menstrual hygiene products with WIC or SNAP benefits?), in addition to figuring out how to provide my patients who menstruate products that will last them until their next appointment. Personally, this has also shown me how much hard work goes into grassroots nonprofit organizations. Lynette and Nya of No More Secrets work so incredibly hard each and every day for their community, and it shows by how much their community loves them. I am so proud and humbled that I was able to work with No More Secrets this summer.” 

 

 

 

Philadelphia City Rowing

 

Health Education Through Sport

 

Student Intern: 

Anthony Ascoli, Temple University, Lewis Katz School of Medicine

 

Academic Preceptor: 

Providenza Loera Rocco, JD, MSW, MBE, HEC-C, Temple University, Center for Urban Bioethics

 

Community Preceptor: 

Caitlin Mance, Philadelphia City Rowing

 

Community Site: 

Philadelphia City Rowing (PCR) works to empower Philadelphia public school students to reach their greatest potential. PCR provides academic support, mentoring, nutrition education and enrichment activities in conjunction with a highly structured athletic program. The goal is to improve the academic achievements, health outcomes and personal development of their participants. PCR maintains a culture that reaches under-resourced youth; puts students first; and is inclusive, transformative and engaged with the community. PCR actively recruits at-risk students in order to reach those who have the most to gain from the programming, and all participants benefit from a team environment that reflects the rich racial, ethnic and socioeconomic diversity of Philadelphia.

 

Project: 

The Bridging the Gaps student intern researched and wrote articles on relevant health topics, ranging from nutrition to cardiovascular health, to be posted on the PCR website in blog format. The articles were designed to be informative, practical and comprehensible so that all participants of PCR can benefit. Overarching themes of preventive medicine and social/mental well-being were intertwined with the goal of improving athletic performance. 

 

Intern Statement:

Anthony Ascoli: “With the unique challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic and the complex situation following the death of George Floyd, I felt strongly that I had to contribute to my Philadelphia community more than ever. Philadelphia City Rowing presented me with an opportunity to combine my passion for athletics and the camaraderie of sport with my desire to use medical knowledge to improve the quality of life of others. I hope that my writings made an impact on the health, happiness and success of those students at PCR. Rowing has brought much joy to my life. PCR provides an opportunity to those who otherwise may miss out on the beautiful feeling of this sport. I am thankful for a chance to be a part of a program that provides a pathway for success through rowing and plan on continuing to contribute beyond the extent of the Bridging the Gaps program.”

 

Philadelphia Futures

 

Futures That Inspire the Present

 

Student Interns: 

Thomas DiFilippo, Drexel University College of Medicine

Brianna Hamilton, Drexel University College of Medicine

Brett Mitchell, Drexel University College of Medicine

Katelyn Sanchez, Drexel University College of Medicine

 

Academic Preceptor: 

Daniel R. Taylor, DO, FAAP, FACOP, St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, Drexel University College of Medicine

 

Community Preceptors:

Jonathan Edwards, Philadelphia Futures

Laura Naylor, Philadelphia Futures

 

Community Site: 

Philadelphia Futures provides academic and social resources for high-potential, economically disadvantaged college-bound students in the Philadelphia School District. It provides low-income students who will be the first generation in their families to attend college with rigorous academic programs and resources to support them through high school and college. 

 

Project:

The Bridging the Gaps student interns helped teach summer classes organized by Philadelphia Futures to prepare students to begin college. Interns created an interactive, educational presentation discussing e-cigarettes and the effects that nicotine and vaping have on adolescent health. Additionally, the interns offered advice in navigating peer pressure around vaping and discussed marketing strategies used by Big Tobacco to target adolescents. In the Career Research and Exploration course for rising high school juniors, the interns delivered a presentation about the path to medical school and becoming a physician.

 

Intern Statements:

Thomas DiFilippo: “Working at Philadelphia Futures this summer was a very rewarding experience. Having the chance to work with high school students and see how much they have grown in only seven weeks is amazing. The students had such interesting perspectives about the pandemic and racial protests currently going on that I will definitely take with me at the conclusion of my internship. I also feel that I gained valuable experience in adapting to new situations while working virtually during the COVID pandemic.” 

 

Brianna Hamilton: “I am forever grateful to Philadelphia Futures for the invaluable opportunity they provided to me this summer. I left every encounter feeling valued, appreciated and supported from both the students and faculty members. I’ve been told over and over how much of an impact I’ve had on these students’ lives by sharing my own journey to medicine. But in all honesty this amazing organization has inspired me to continue my passion for volunteering and community service despite the whirlwind COVID-19 has created in many of our lives. This summer I was reminded that the next generation has the potential to change this world for the better, despite the troubling times we are now facing. Seeing these students speak with confidence and assurance on many heavy and intricate topics was truly refreshing! I’m excited to see what the future holds for these students and Philadelphia Futures as a whole.” 

 

Brett Mitchell: “I am very fortunate to help the Philadelphia Futures organization this summer and learn about everything they do for the Philadelphia youth. The rising high school juniors that I had the pleasure of knowing this summer have such unique and interesting career aspirations and skills, and I’m sure their career development course has put them in a better position for success. The diversity among these classes is something that I really appreciated to see, and I have been inspired to continue informing the youth about the path to medical school. Therefore, this internship will have a lasting impact on me and reaffirmed my interest in helping kids — especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds.” 

 

Katelyn Sanchez: “I am extremely appreciative of the BTG CHIP program for providing me the opportunity to partner with Philadelphia Futures this summer. Over the past eight weeks, I have acquired new skills, met amazing people and grown in ways I never could have imagined. Although the entirety of the internship was remote, the staff and students at Philadelphia Futures happily welcomed me into their community and made me feel valued. I have been inspired by my students and their diligent efforts to grow and develop their understanding of the world, and I admire the resiliency they exhibit despite the current global pandemic and the recent move to remote learning. Their willingness to adapt and engage encouraged me to think creatively to present material in interactive and nuanced ways. Additionally, I enjoyed belonging to a community that is truly devoted to the mission and vision of their organization. The impact that Philadelphia Futures has on the surrounding community is unparalleled, and I look forward to continuing our partnership into my second year at DUCOM and beyond.”

 

Sankofa Community Farm at Bartram’s Garden

 

Building Community and Empowering Youth Through Farming and Foodways

 

Student Interns: 

Andrea Jin, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine

Gianna LaBella, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing

 

Academic Preceptors: 

Ann L. O’Sullivan, PhD, FAAN, CRNP, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing

Christopher Renjilian, MD, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 

 

Community Preceptor: 

Ty Holmberg, Sankofa Community Farm at Bartram’s Garden

 

Community Site: 

The Sankofa Community Farm consists of 40 acres of land and is a vital part of Bartram’s Garden, located in and serving Southwest Philadelphia. The farm is rooted in the idea of Sankofa, a concept from the Akan language of West Africa meaning “it is not taboo to go back and fetch what you forgot”; in other words, we must learn from our past history in order to better move forward. With this in mind, the farm has a central mission of creating food sovereignty, promoting community health and supporting youth development. Using an African focus for their work, the farm relies on local leadership to foster connections with the land, increase access to healthy foods and build a sense of belonging for all who walk through its doors. The farm employs high school interns who work on many projects, including producing and distributing more than 15,000 pounds of produce each year, supporting local residents by providing space to grow their own produce, holding farm stands to sell produce to locals at affordable rates, distributing more than 80,000 vegetable transplants to farms and gardens in Philadelphia, and hosting more than 1,500 volunteers every year. In addition, the Sankofa Community Farm tackles and attempts to address many social issues, including inaccessibility to grocery stores and fresh produce and the stereotypical idea of “whiteness” within the sphere of health and wellness. 

 

https://bartramsgarden.org/explore-bartrams/the-farm/ 

 

Project: 

The Bridging the Gaps student interns helped keep the farm’s summer job program for high school students running despite major changes and a shift to a mostly online curriculum due to the COVID-19 pandemic. They set up and maintained a Google Classroom through which the youth could access and submit weekly assignments in the areas of gardening, cooking, culture/foodways, community and wellness. On Friday afternoons, the interns taught health and wellness lessons over Zoom on topics that included nutrition for cardiovascular health and mental health, stress and stigma. The interns also communicated with individual students on a regular basis via phone and Zoom to check in on their progress on personal wellness goals, assignments and community-based projects. Further, the interns provided administrative support as needed, collecting signed forms, assisting another staff member during weekly virtual cooking classes and collating resources for students. 

Intern Statements: 

Andrea Jin: “My Bridging the Gaps internship was an incredible learning experience despite this year’s virtual format, as it pushed us to overcome barriers of distance and technology to support and teach our students. It was a privilege and pleasure to be able to connect with the youth and hear their insights during our weekly group lessons and one-on-one calls. The experience of delving deep into discussions of culture, food and community wellness also really prompted me to reflect on my personal and professional interests and how they can integrate into a tailored career path. Learning alongside the high school interns about foodways and food sovereignty reaffirmed for me that I hope to eventually work in a space at the intersection of primary care, public health in urban communities and social determinants of health, specifically access to healthy food.”

 

Gianna LaBella: “Being an intern with the Sankofa Community Farm has been a transformative, eye-opening and meaningful experience. Not only have I been able to come to understand and value the intersectionality between culture and food, I gained a newfound appreciation for the importance of community and belonging in everyone’s lives along with a deeper sense of awareness for the land and its history. I have learned that there are many factors that contribute to health and wellness and have been enlightened to the many barriers communities face in attaining this. By delving into the topics of race, class, culture and inaccessibility, I have been able to take away valuable lessons on the inequities in the world around me, and the importance of striving to bring about change. Bridging the Gaps has offered me the opportunity to better comprehend and listen to the lived experiences of those around me and dedicate work to creating equity and justice, and is an experience I will treasure and take with me long into my future career as a healthcare professional.”

 
 
 
 
 

Steppingstone Scholars 

 

Internet Essentials Hotline: How May I Help You?

 

Student Interns:

Julian Rana, Temple University, Lewis Katz School of Medicine

Justina Refela, Temple University, School of Pharmacy

 

Academic Preceptor:

Providenza Loera Rocco, JD, MSW, MBE, HEC-C, Temple University, Center for Urban Bioethics

 

Community Preceptors: 

Christopher Avery, Vice President of Programs, Steppingstone Scholars, Inc.

Elizabeth R. Jackson, EdM, CAS College and Workforce Coordinator, Steppingstone Scholars, Inc.

 

Community Site: 

Steppingstone Scholars is a Philadelphia-based community organization aimed at providing students across the region with academic and personal growth support. The target population is Philadelphia students who may experience academic challenges that create unequal difficulties in achieving life ambitions. Steppingstone Scholars consists of a number of pathways for students, including the Steppingstone Academy, the Middle Grades Academy, Upward Bound, the Blending Learning Initiative and Pipeline Services. All of the pathways within Steppingstone Scholars merge with the unified goal of creating educational equality for all children. 

 

Through Upward Bound, a community project was designed to address the lack of internet access for families in Philadelphia. Through a partnership between Steppingstone Scholars, Comcast Internet Essentials and several Philadelphia schools, families identified as qualifying for affordable internet were contacted and offered a solution to the burden of a lack of quality access to the web. 

 

Project: 

The Bridging the Gaps student interns reached out to more than 650 families from Dobbins High School to offer them Internet Essentials from Comcast for $9.95 a month. For the families that already had Internet Essentials, Steppingstone Scholars paid their bills through January 2021. This allows families to allocate the money elsewhere that would have gone to the bill. To most middle-class families, $10 is not a lot of money, but for families who send their children to a public school in North Philadelphia, that money can go a long way.

 

Intern Statements:

Julian Rana: “The lack of internet connection is abundant in Philadelphia, and unfortunately the pandemic has only illuminated the inequity. Through Steppingstone Scholars and Internet Essentials, families were provided with affordable internet that could alleviate this strain. Like most initiatives, the logistics of identifying families and communicating with them about the program created some barriers. However, these obstacles had to be met now; otherwise, the goal of connecting all families to the internet would never be achieved.”

 

Justina Refela: “While making all those calls, I would find myself sounding very robotic and repetitive. I would lose faith that people would even pick up a call from a Delaware number, but occasionally, I got the family who already has Internet Essentials. When I would tell them we could cover their bill until January 2021, they would get so excited. It made a difference, even if it wasn’t to the majority of the families we called. We helped where we could, and I couldn’t be happier.”

 

 

 

Students Run Philly Style 

 

Using Running as a Vessel for Mentorship and Health

 

Student Interns: 

Kathryn (Tess) Doran, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing

Taylor Kvilhaug, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine 

 

Academic Preceptors: 

Joan I. Gluch, PhD, RDH, PHDHP, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine 

Ann L. O’Sullivan, PhD, FAAN, CRNP, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing

 

Community Preceptor: 

Andrew Kucer, Executive Director, Students Run Philly Style

 

Community Site: 

Students Run Philly Style (SRPS) is a mentor-based program and community that uses running to help students improve their confidence, discipline and goal-setting abilities. Students and mentors train together and set a goal to run a long-distance race of either 10 miles, a half marathon or a full marathon. SRPS seeks to provide students the opportunity to build confidence, social skills, work ethic and an overall healthy lifestyle. Because SRPS is a nonprofit in the Philadelphia community, donations are used to cover 100 percent of the cost of running shoes, program gear, race entries and transportation, which allows the program to remain accessible to and inclusive of students of all backgrounds.

 

Project: 

The Bridging the Gaps student interns worked mainly with two facets of the company: marketing and programming. The interns worked with the marketing team to research potential donors in the Philadelphia area and increase the diversity of the donor base. The interns revised and edited the winter curriculum given to all students by expanding the nutritional information and creating an informative piece on the cardiovascular system. The interns also worked on gaining support for a state LGBTQ+ grant.

 

 

Intern Statements: 

Tess Doran: “Working with Bridging the Gaps and Students Run Philly Style this past summer has allowed me a unique perspective on healthcare and community health that I had not yet experienced. I was pleasantly surprised by the impact I was able to have on an organization while having all interactions remain virtual. Working virtually this summer taught me that the amount of times you interact with someone is not as important as the quality of the interactions you do have. I hope to carry the experiences I have gained this summer as a community health intern into my future practice as a nurse.” 

 

Taylor Kvilhaug: “I have enjoyed many parts of working for Students Run Philly Style this summer. I have done marketing work, programming work and have given the program itself critiques in how to make them better. Yet my favorite part of working for this program this summer was interviewing Danny and being able to see how much of an impact Students Run Philly Style has on the youth of Philadelphia. The program has become a home and support network for many students across the community helping them with success now and down the road, no matter who they are, where they are from or how athletic they are. It’s a place for everyone.” 

 

Urban Tree Connection 

 

Collaborating to Cultivate Health in West Philadelphia 

 

Student Intern: 

Emily Danilak, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Occupational Therapy

 

Academic Preceptor: 

Maria Hervada-Page, MSW, Thomas Jefferson University, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

 

Community Preceptor: 

Marissa York, Urban Tree Connection

 

Community Site: 

Urban Tree Connection is an organization that serves residents of the Haddington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Its mission is to build a neighborhood-rooted food and land system through community leadership development and land-based strategies in West Philadelphia. 

 

Project: 

The Bridging the Gaps student intern collaborated in various ways with the site throughout the summer. She created flyers to promote a class about developing healthy habits and a series of graphics, each explaining one of the organization’s values, to be distributed to community members. She also collaborated with other staff members in the organization to educate youth through the Youth Apprenticeship Program. 

Intern Statement: 

Emily Danilak: “My work with Urban Tree Connection helped me gain a greater understanding about the importance of empowering people to cultivate their own food. I learned that farming is not only a way to combat food insecurity in the Philadelphia area, but it also gives residents confidence. I am thankful that I was able to attend one of the organization’s events and observe firsthand the positive influence that this organization has on its community members. The organization’s passion for giving individuals the education and resources needed to become healthier was truly inspiring to me.”

 

WorkReady Philadelphia: Educators for Education 

 

A Virtual Summer With Educators for Education

 

Student Interns: 

Allison Beer, University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy & Practice 

Katherine Hall, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing 

 

Academic Preceptors: 

Zvi D. Gellis, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy & Practice

Ann L. O’Sullivan, PhD, FAAN, CRNP, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing

 

Community Preceptor: 

Anthony Singleton, Educators for Education

 

Community Site:  

WorkReady Philadelphia is a program of the Philadelphia Youth Network that provides summer and year-long programming for vulnerable youth aged 12 to 21 within Philadelphia. WorkReady partners with more than 70 local organizations to create meaningful and educational career-oriented experiences. Through work-based and digital learning, WorkReady aims to provide participants with the necessary skills to be successful in their future educational and career paths. Educators for Education is one of the organizations providing a WorkReady summer experience to teens. 

 

https://www.workready.org

 

Project: 

The Bridging the Gaps student interns worked with the WorkReady Philadelphia provider Educators for Education as it navigated how to offer teens a meaningful and educational summer in the midst of an ongoing pandemic. The interns created online magazines, presentations and videos to be accessed by participating teens. Topics included mental and physical wellness in a pandemic, coping with stress, anger management, financial literacy, public speaking, résumé-building, preparing for interviews and more. In addition, interns collaborated to create an ongoing virtual career-day series that featured interviews with professionals in a variety of career paths. Beyond creating curriculum, interns assisted participants in using a new digital learning platform.

 

Intern Statements: 

Allison Beer: “With a pandemic occurring this year, I know that this summer was unlike any previous summer for Bridging the Gaps and WorkReady Philadelphia. Given the context, I am grateful to have been surrounded by health professionals so dedicated to discussing and addressing health disparities in our city of Philadelphia. At WorkReady, I gained valuable tools and techniques to better collaborate and engage with our strong, creative and resilient adolescent population.” 

 

Katherine Hall: “This summer with WorkReady was incredibly enriching. I’m thankful that I got to meet people in this program who came from different professions and backgrounds, and that I’ve gotten the opportunity to make new friendships. In terms of my professional career, I believe that my individual partnership with WorkReady has helped me practice how to be engaging and informative for our teen audience. The ability to be both engaging and informative is a skill that I am certain will come in handy when interacting with the adolescent population during my nursing career. Though I’ve only gotten brief contact with Philadelphia youth, I know that this is an incredible program where peer mentorship and collaboration is held in high regard. Though this program experience was a lot different than I expected because of the COVID-19 pandemic, I’m truly grateful that I was a part of it.”

 
 
 
 

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